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 Free Pattern : A Goose in the Pond Block

Goose in the Pond is a traditional block featuring an engaging arrangement of squares, triangles and rectangles. Although the same shapes are repeated throughout the block, positioning changes create a very eye-catching effect. Like many patchwork blocks, Goose in the Pond sports a name as interesting as its appearance. At one point in time, there was certain to be a homespun story about this block design.

Goose in the Pond block

How big do I create it?

Goose in the Pond is a larger block, measuring 15 inches square. As a result, it is a particularly good choice for pillows or chair cushions.

Instructions - Making this block

Goose in the Pond is made from basic shapes, but there are many in a single block. Cutting is pretty straightforward, but piecing takes some concentration to insure proper positioning.

Each block contains five large squares, twelve rectangles, twenty-four triangles and thirty-six small squares. Rotary cutting is probably the best choice for this block to save time and because it only uses basic shapes.

To make pieces for this block :

  • Cut five squares from a 3 1/2-inch strip of fabric A.
    Fabric A square cutting
  • Cut four 3 1/2-inch long rectangles from a 1 1/2-inch wide strip of fabric A.
    Fabric A rectangle cutting
  • Cut eight 3 1/2-inch long rectangles from a 1 1/2-inch wide strip of fabric B.
    Fabric B rectangle cutting
  • Cut twenty squares from a 1 1/2-inch strip of fabric A.
    Fabric A square cutting
  • Cut sixteen squares from a 1 1/2-inch strip of fabric B.
    Fabric B square cutting
  • Cut twelve right triangles from a 3 7/8-inch strip of fabric A.
    Fabric A triangle cutting
  • Cut twelve right triangles from a 3 7/8-inch strip of fabric C.
    Fabric C triangle cutting
A Goose in the Pond block can be broken down to into five rows. To begin piecing, components of each row must be assembled first. There are three elements to assemble, triangle-pair squares, small Nine-Patches and rectangle-strip squares. Follow the steps below, using a quarter-inch seam allowance, for their construction.

  • Place a fabric A triangle over a fabric C triangle, right sides together. Stitch in place and press.
  • Repeat with all remaining triangles to form twelve triangle-pair squares.
  • Collect five small fabric A squares and four fabric B squares.
  • Place one fabric A square over a fabric B square, right sides facing, and stitch.
  • Repeat this step to stitch a small fabric A square to the other side of the fabric B square. This completes the first row of your Nine-Patch.
  • Repeat the previous two steps to create the third row for the Nine-Patch.
  • Place one fabric B square over a small fabric A square and stitch in place. Repeat, so that a second fabric B square is stitched on the other side of the small fabric A square. This is the second row of the Nine-Patch
  • Press all seams.
  • Place the first row over the second row, right sides together and seams matching. Stitch in place.
  • Place the third row on the opposite side of the second row in the same manner, stitch in place and press.
  • Repeat with all remaining small fabric A and fabric B squares to make four Nine-Patches.
  • Place one fabric B rectangle over a fabric A rectangle, right side together, and stitch. Place a second fabric B rectangle over the fabric A rectangle in the same manner and stitch to the other side. Press all seams. Repeat to form four rectangle-strip squares.
  • Triangle pair square

    Nine-Patch

    Rectangle assembly

With the smaller elements assembled, it is time to piece the five rows. Fortunately, two pairs of rows are duplicates, so the process is very simple. The most important thing to keep in mind at this point is to pay close attention to the positioning of triangles in each row. There is variation, so be sure to compare your layout against the images in this pattern before sewing. Follow the steps below, again using a quarter-inch seam allowance for all sewing.

  • Rows 1 and 5 : Place one triangle-pair square over another, right sides together and stitch. Repeat with two more triangle-pair squares to form a second oblong. Place one oblong over a large fabric A square and stitch. Place the second oblong over the large fabric A square and stitch. Press all seams.
    Rows 1 and 5
  • Rows 2 and 4 : Place one triangle-pair square over a Nine-Patch, right sides together and stitch. Repeat with another triangle-pair square and Nine-Patch to form a second oblong. Place one oblong over a rectangle-strip square and stitch. Repeat with the second oblong, stitching to the other side of the rectangle-strip square. Press all seams.
    Rows 2 and 4
  • Row 3 : Place one large fabric A square over a rectangle-strip square and stitch to form an oblong. Repeat to form a second oblong. Place one oblong over the remaining fabric A square and stitch. Repeat with the second oblong, stitching it to the other side of the large fabric A square. Press all seams.
    Row 3
With the rows pieced, all that remains is to assemble the block. It is very important to check positioning in this step too. With a quarter-inch seam allowance, use the following steps to complete your block.

  • Place row 1 over row 2 with the right sides together. Line up all seams, and stitch.
  • Repeat this step with rows 4 and 5.
  • Place the row 1/row 2 assembly over row 3 with right sides together. Line up seams and stitch in place.
  • Place the row 4/row 5 assembly over row 3 with right sides together. Line up seams and stitch
  • Press all seams flat.

Row assembly

Putting the block to use in a quilt

Goose in the Pond is one of those blocks that creates an eye-catching geometric pattern when placed in succession. In this sample layout, all blocks are worked up using the same yellow, green and white fabric. The repetition of fabrics creates an unbroken pattern of lattice, diamonds and squares for the eye to dance across.

Goose in the Pond quilt

Goose in the Pond also provides an attractive backdrop for graceful quilting motifs. In this example, blocks of Goose in the Pond are spread conservatively across the quilt face, drawing attention to the stitching instead.

Goose in the Pond blocks with quilted solid blocks

More Creative Ideas For Quilters

This block also works well with sashing. The example layout below features Goose in the Pond blocks framed by solid sashing as well as small Nine-Patch accents. Both the sashing and Nine-Patches use colors from the blocks. Because Goose in the Pond has so much visual activity, keeping the sashing and borders simple and complementary is the best bet.

With sashing and Nine-Patches

Goose in the Pond can also be used for a sampler-style quilt. In this layout, the blocks are worked up in shades of blue and white. In one version, the lighter blue is more prominent, and darker blue dominates the second version so that the blocks mirror each other. The alternating blocks are separated by plain white sashing and blue corner squares to set off the effect. As in the above example, the sashing acts as a complimentary frame to the blocks' colorful drama.

Alternating sampler with sashing

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